Have you ever seen crocheted lace like this?

At the same antique shop in Canandaigua, New York, where I found those wonderful Niagara Falls souvenir salad servers, I picked up eight feet of this amazing hand-crocheted lace.

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Price? A whopping $6. If there had been more of it I would have bought it all!

I loved the creamy color of the cotton thread and the intricacy of the pattern.

And I loved the ingeniousness of the pattern. Look closely:

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Two materials, one lacy effect!

Part of this lace is crocheted with a fine cotton thread. And part of it is commercially-made baby rickrack!

Have you ever seen anything like that? I haven’t!

Here’s the end, where the maker tied off her thread.

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The other end had been cut. So some of this lace was used for something.

The alternating circular motifs were crocheted, then the straight border was crocheted on top.

The alternating circular motifs were crocheted, then the straight border was crocheted on top.

I wonder what this lace was made to decorate. Pillowcases? Sheets? The hem of a wedding gown?

Here’s a close-up showing how the rickrack was joined with crochet.

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You’d be using a tiny, tiny crochet hook to do that. I’m not even sure those tiny hook sizes are made anymore. Vintage ones are easy to find, though.

Vintage steel crochet hooks in sizes 8, 9, 11, 12, and 13. My eyes are too old to even think about using these!

Vintage steel crochet hooks in sizes 8, 9, 11, 12, and 13. My eyes are too old to even think about using them.

What shall I do with this amazing lace?  I don’t know yet! What would YOU do with it?

 

 


Why don’t they make these any more?

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The same towel in three colorways: dark red, bright green, and bright red. On top of my favorite turquoise Wilendur dogwood-blossom tablecloth!

Last weekend I picked up four vintage printed kitchen towels at a great antique shop in Ilion, New York.

It’s the colors that got me, of course!

The floral print is pretty.

This is half the towel. The other half has the same motif.

This is half the towel. The other half has the same motif.

Though the long edges were raveled a bit, the towels didn’t show any wear or stains. They looked new, actually

Then I looked closer at the raveled edges.

Cut on the dotted line!

Cut on the dotted line!

Well, well, well! Looks to me like these were sew-it-yourself towels that the original owner never finished.

The selvedges (the finished woven edges) of the fabric are on the towels’ short ends. The long ends all have those red cut-on-this-line dashes. So the printed fabric was about 19 inches wide—perfect for a kitchen towel.

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Maybe you could buy a bunch of towel panels off the bolt at Woolworth’s? You could cut them apart and hem the edges, and you’d have nice new kitchen towels.

Why, o why is nobody making manufacturing these anymore?!

Other than the fact that most people just can’t be bothered to sew, that is. (You vintage lovers would do it in a heartbeat, wouldn’t you?)

To finish my towels, I pulled threads on  the raveled edges until the grain line was straight.

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Then I trimmed the resulting “fringe” close to the edge.

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Press under the side hem twice to enclose the raw edge, and stitch it down.

I used my trusty old Elna 5000, broken bobbin-door latch and all.

I used my trusty old Elna 5000, broken bobbin-door latch and all.

One more quick pressing, and presto!

New old towels!

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I won’t be keeping them, though. They’re in the pile for the next month’s Vintage Bazaar.

 

 


Greetings from Niagara Falls!

 

We’re home from our road trip to Niagara Falls.

And slowly we turn . . . step by step . . . inch by inch . . . back to the ordinary things like dishes and laundry.

(Extra points if you’re old enough to recognize that quote.)

I bought myself a souvenir before we even got there. Because I am a total sucker for vintage souvenirs, you know.

In a cute little antique shop in Canandaigua, I found these salad servers. They’re never-used and still in the box!

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Space-age Styron plastic, that is. Were these a gift for somebody back home—the new mother-in-law, perhaps?—who thought they were just too nice to actually use?

American-made, of course.

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Yes, I’d love to know what else MS Products produced!

And so pretty with the hand-painted scenes.

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Looks like a view from the river—American Falls on the left there, Horseshoe Falls in the background. Such delicate details!

The back of the handles is all crystal-ly for a good grip.

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Let’s add a spinach salad and wish we were still on vacation!

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Back from a vacation shopping spree!

vintage treasures from antique shopping spree

All this and MORE! Yes, I couldn’t fit it all into one picture.

Tablecloths! Aprons! Vintage fabric! Thermoses! (Or is that thermi?)

This is what happens when two vintage-crazy sisters go on a nine-day vacation with the ulterior motive of hitting as many antique shops as possible between the Finger Lakes in upper New York and Niagara Falls, ON.

Sadly, I don’t have time this morning to show the rest of my loot. In the week to come I’ll have better photos and mini reviews of the great shops we visited in Canadaigua, Niagara-on-the-Lake, and Corning.

So stay tuned for more vintage goodness! We left lots of great stuff behind for you!


Weekend road trip!

Vintage bright red Austin Mini

Vintage bright red Austin Mini parked in front of the boat shop on the banks of the Parker River. Wish it were mine!

We’re off on a weekend jaunt.

Unfortunately, this is not our car.

Not our kayak, either.

Boo hoo.

Hope you’re doing something fun this weekend.

There’s still a lot of summer left!


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